Accomodating emotionally impaired

The examples presented are drawn from real-life situations as described by police officers or encountered by the Department of Justice in its enforcement of the ADA.

An individual is considered to have a "disability" if he or she has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, has a record of such an impairment, or is regarded as having such an impairment.Police officers, sheriff's deputies, and other law enforcement personnel have always interacted with persons with disabilities and, for many officers and deputies, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) may mean few changes in the way they respond to the public.To respond to questions that may arise, this document offers common sense suggestions to assist law enforcement agencies in complying with the ADA.If you might be considered ineligible or unsuitable for public or multifamily subsidized housing because of behavior related to your disability, but you could meet your basic obligations as a tenant if a reasonable accommodation were made, then you should be eligible. For example, in 1992 the Cambridge Human Rights Commission was declared to be substantially equivalent to HUD under the federal fair housing law and therefore can enforce compliance with the anti-discrimination laws for residents of Cambridge. The concept of reasonable accommodation is broad and flexible, so you can be creative. Inclusionary programs provide all students with an increased awareness and understanding of individual differences.

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